Tag Archives: motivation

Alone But Not Lonely

I have been thinking a lot about being single at 57 years of age, lately.  Without going into unnecessary detail, I was briefly married a long time ago to an unpleasant woman.  I have never felt compelled to take a chance on repeating that mistake.  That is why I find myself single well after the half-century mark.

Here’s the thing:  I am not bothered by being alone.  I have always been comfortable with my own company.  I believe that this has fostered in me a certain self-sufficiency.  I answer to no schedule but that which I choose, and I find a lot of satisfaction in that.   I would probably make a really good hermit, as long as my cave had WiFi.

Frankly at my age, it’s hard to imagine having someone around all the time.  I have work, church, and friends, so I’m not planning on changing any time soon.   I am, as Mary Chapin Carpenter sang, alone but not lonely.

Solitude need not be isolation.

What Motivates You?

I strenuously exercise on a regular basis because I want to be healthy.  I eat vegan because I don’t want animals to suffer on my behalf.  I decrappify  because I want less stuff cluttering up my house and attention.  I do 90 percent of the repairs on my house to save money and frankly, because I can.  So there you have it, the motivations for four of the big ticket items in my life.

Here’s the thing:  motivation is all at once personal and situation-specific.  At the end of the day, each of us must identify that which we value and how much we value it.  For example, if you want to lose weight but aren’t willing to move a bit more and eat a bit less, you like the idea of losing weight but you aren’t motivated enough to do the necessary work.  I lost count of the number of times someone has told me they’d love to drop a few pounds, but when I suggest easy ways to start, they balk.

They are not motivated so much as they are wishful.  Well guess what, there ain’t no genie in a magic lamp here.

It isn’t just weight loss, either.  Anything that can or should matter to you (and I leave it to you to make that distinction) is subject to motivation.  And, that which is subject to motivation is also subject to its loss.  So how do you find and maintain motivation?  Here is what works for me: keep the reason I started something in mind (I keep my “before” photo on my fridge to remind myself why I exercise), I participate in online accountability groups for support and feedback, I view challenges (like home repairs) as opportunities not limitations, and I don’t let setbacks define my level of success (speed bumps are not the end of the road).

So, what motivates you?

A bear chasing a cyclis-that's motivation!

       Motivation isn’t always this obvious-luckily!

My Intentional Reboot

I can’t believe I’ve been away from here for a month!  Time to get back into my groove!

As I continue my pursuit of a simpler life, I’m sometimes surprised at how far I have come, and how far I have to go.  The thing is, this simpler life thing is not a one-time effort.  It is an ongoing process.  I think I have picked most of the low hanging fruit and now it is time to reexamine what I have accomplished.  My goal is to determine what steps I take next.

For example, I got rid of a lot of unread books and magazines early on, and mostly switched to e-books  and magazines.  Over the past couple years I’ve accumulated a small stockpile of hardcover books, a couple magazines that aren’t readily accessible as e-zines, and comic books (a store opened up nearby, which is hard to resist).  I plan to go through all of my accumulated hardcopy reading material and mercilessly purge.  I am also going to investigate the cost effectiveness of a service like Comixology for digital copies of the comic books I like.

I’m also going to go through my clothing again, and anything I haven’t worn in the past year will be donated or turned into paint rags.  As much as it pains me, I am also going to inventory my tools, and eliminate duplicates.  A couple of winter projects are going to be scanning my photos and ripping my DVDs to a terabyte drive.  Clearly, I have my work cut out for me.

But realistically, if a given item is neither useful to me nor a source of joy, I don’t need it taking up space in my life.

Useful or beautiful, or gone.

Useful, beautiful, or gone!

Dark Clouds and Their Linings

I work for the Maine CDC.  I mention this because beginning at 12:01 AM July 1, 2017 Maine government shut down for three days due to lack of a budget.  There is much I could say about that, but this is neither the time nor the place.  What I’d like to relay to you is how my spending habits changed for those three days.

As soon as it became clear that the shutdown was going to happen, I curtailed my discretionary spending.  That is to say, on July 1, 2, and 3 I did not buy anything besides groceries.  I did go see a dinner musical with friends but we had already bought the tickets a while ago.  What I found enlightening was how easy it was to not spend on frivolous things.  I made coffee instead of going out and buying it.  I read some e-books and e-zines I already had.  I made my own meals (again, the sole exception being the show I went to).

While I was (and to a degree remain) annoyed by the shutdown that kept me out for work and which had every appearance of going on for a couple weeks, it was a valuable lesson on spending and priorities.  I guess this cloud really did have a silver lining!

It’s amazing what you don’t need to spend money on.

Spending Less Than a Little

In the June issue of Success Magazine there is an article which poses the question: can you spend money only on essentials for one month?  As written in the table of contents “No fancy coffee.  No new clothes.  No eating out.  Nothing fun.  Do you have the self-discipline to go a month without spending money on unnecessary items?”  Wow…nothing fun?

I honestly don’t know if I have that kind of self-discipline.  Thinking about it, here is what I come up with as “necessary”: basic food for me and my cats, prescriptions, soap and toilet paper, mortgage, utilities, gasoline for commuting to work, and my church offering.  So that would mean for me foregoing my weekly dinner out with friends; three takeout coffees per day-black, no sugar; no purchased snacks during the day; no comic books, movies, or Amazon Prime video rentals; no impulse purchases; and so on.  I admit that while I don’t buy a lot of new clothes (hardly any unless something wears out, in fact) and other household items, I also don’t pay a lot attention to my “nickel and dime” expenses.  As an aside, that is clearly an outdated phrase!

I’m honestly not prepared to go a whole month on a no-spending spree.  I will though commit to keeping detailed track of my expenses for a week beginning when I wake up tomorrow.  Care to join me?

A little bit at a time will eventually add up to a lot.